What Makes A Children’s Book A Classic?

What is a classic? Mark Twain said, “A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read.”

Contrary to Mark Twain’s quote it seems that a classic is literature that countless have enjoyed and found relevant. These stories have successfully found their way from one generation to the next and withstanding the test of time.

Children’s classics are wonderful stories full of adventure and memorable characters. Characters are believable and face challenges with vigor and a creative spirit. Classics compete and hold their own amid a growing number of new and exciting books of today.

Common threads that address us as people are often found in children’s classics. Adults and children both relate to topics that speak about love, hope, fear, family, loss, and the need for acceptance. Classic children’s books are about things that matter. The themes of classics are as comforting and engaging for children today as they were for children in the past. Classics speak to the inner person, and although times change people do not.

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